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Smoked Paprika Chips and Roasted Garlic White Bean Dip

Every now and then, my sister will send me a photo of an individual chip without saying anything, because we both know it’s our idea of “the perfect chip”—evenly and heavily coated with whatever seasoning the store-bought bag promises. It’s a shared moment of celebration even when we’re apart, and I wish there were more.

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Ethan Frisch’s Spiced Winter Squash

Ethan originally used nutmeg fruit (the thing that surrounds the nutmeg that we’re all familiar with) as one of the seasonings here, but it’s hard to find. No problem. The fruit is a bit tart, so he recommends using some lemon rind to add a bit of acidity.

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Food with Mark Bittman: Patrick Joyce

Leading British social historian Patrick Joyce talks to Mark and Kate about the actual meaning behind the word “peasant” and why it’s been co-opted so much, what we should be mourning about the near loss of peasant life and what we can learn from it, and the poignancy of seeing generations change.

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Baked Macaroni and Cheese

One of the most popular recipes in the original How to Cook Everything, which I attribute to too many people growing up with the mac and cheese that comes from a box. The real thing is rich, filling, delicious, and dead easy.

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When You Mash Your Chickpeas, Magic Happens

When you mash chickpeas, they disappear. In a good way. Imagine what this stir-fry would be like if instead of a hearty sauce to coat crisp-cooked vegetables, you end up with a handful of errant beans bobbing in a watery pool at the bottom of the pan. No one wants that.

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Tandoori Chicken (Or Salmon)

You cannot make “authentic” tandoori chicken without a tandoor, the clay oven closely associated with Indian cooking and used to make many of that country’s wonderful breads. But, believe it or not, most people (myself included) don’t own a clay oven, so we have to find a workaround. Turns out you can replicate the seasonings and grill or broil it so that it becomes very similar to the original. It isn’t difficult, and it’s really rewarding.

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Coffee Cake

The classic breakfast or brunch cake, equally good for dessert or as a snack with a cup of tea.

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Food with Mark Bittman: Lelani Lewis

The thoughtful and talented chef talks to Mark and Kate about why she named her dinner series and new book Code Noir, after a monstrous set of French regulations put into effect by Louis XIV; why some island cultures gradually veer towards the cultural homogeneity of the US; why pulling on heartstrings is sometimes the best way; and her showboat recipe.

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Lelani Lewis’s Plantain and Pumpkin Curry

This is anything but a traditional recipe. I threw it together on a whim on a winter day, when I still had plantains and a pumpkin that urgently needed to be used. It’s a mild, almost sweet curry—if you’re a fan of Indian korma, this is really something for you. Feel free to add more chili. I prefer to eat this with a tasty flaky roti. — Lelani Lewis

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Lelani Lewis’s Caribbean Curry Powder

Caribbean curry powders differ from Indian ones by the use of allspice and nutmeg, thus forming a perfect marriage between the two cuisines. This is my version. —Lelani Lewis

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Brown Rice Cereal, Minus the Cereal

It’s been head-exploding to discover a new alternative to traditional hot cereal grains like oats and cornmeal: ​brown rice cereal​. It’s like broken rice with benefits. Whole-grain goodness for one; quick-cooking for another. This cereal has got use rethinking techniques, using it instead of white rice, and adding it to places that brown rice has never been before.

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Crunchy Brown Rice Cheese Skirt with Kimchi Salad

You’ve seen cheese ooze out of a sandwich or ​enchilada​ into the pan, right? It bubbles for a few seconds before turning golden and crisp. Sort of like the simplest Italian frico, only we prefer to call it a “cheese skirt.” Now imagine this skirt has a little crunch when you bite down, like a rice cracker.

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Unbelievably Quick Brown Rice “Jook” with Garnishes Galore

The universe of mush and porridge drapes the world in creamy goo and we’re glad for it. These warming dishes are usually made by slowly simmering and stirring ground wheat or corn, then topping with sweet or savory foods. (As described in Mark’s recent polenta story, with his revolutionary “slurry” hack.) Read more about the notable exception below.

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Chicken Enchiladas

This is a classic taqueria dish that is even better when made at home. Although the preparation takes some time, enchiladas are delicious and fun for parties or potlucks. You can fill and roll the tortillas ahead of time and then top with the sauce and cheese and bake immediately before serving.

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Pasta with Broccoli Rabe and Ricotta

Stir a cup of ricotta cheese into hot pasta, add a splash of cooking water, and you’ve got a rich and creamy sauce that took you 30 seconds to make. Pleasantly bitter broccoli rabe is the perfect vegetable to cut through the richness of the cheese. But you could also use kale, radicchio, or even cabbage. And if you use whole wheat pasta here, all the better nutritionally and flavor-wise.

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Food with Mark Bittman: Greg D’Alesandre

The Dandelion Chocolate Chief Sourcerer talks to Mark and Kate about why there’s massive volatility in the cocoa market right now, what sustainable and fair sourcing actually means in the cocoa industry, and how and why people should think about chocolate differently.

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Make-Ahead Gravy

Traditionally, gravy made on Thanksgiving is done at the last minute, after the turkey has been removed from the roasting pan. Here’s a secret: There’s no need to make gravy right before serving. You can make it up to five days ahead. Then, as you reheat it, whisk in the turkey pan drippings for extra flavor. The result is every bit as good as last-minute gravy — and far less crazy-making.

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Vegetable Purée

Purées are all-purpose: They make a perfect bed for burgers, cutlets, “meat” balls, and slices of cooked tofu, tempeh, or seitan. Or use them underneath other vegetables like asparagus, broccoli spears, sliced or cubed eggplant, or roasted chunks of potato. This recipe is a straightforward template for puréeing almost any vegetable.

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